Tag Archives: paul lepage

Want to win reelection? Do what you promise.

“Politicians lie.” That is the conventional wisdom, right? It is a bit cynical. After all, most people who find their way into public service have some sort of background in the community. Maybe they volunteer with schools. Maybe they have served in some other local or state office. In almost all cases, they are good […]

You know what Maine needs? More pork.

Maine offered a new spin on an old saw this week. Everyone knows about “pork barrel” politics, where elected officials effectively bribe taxpayers with their own money. It describes a scenario where a legislator works to get a pet project funded for political gain and glory. This week saw the introduction of “pork freezer” politics. […]

Symbols matter. That’s why Maine should have a new flag.

Symbols are important. The American flag will fly at half-staff throughout Maine until Sunday, when Berwick firefighter Capt. Joel Barnes is laid to rest. Lowering the flag is one way — a symbol — by which we honor those who have lost their lives in service to others. There are plenty of other symbols we […]

How service in Afghanistan reminded me that voting is awesome

With the exception of the 2nd Congressional District, the election is now over in Maine. Plenty has been — and will be — written about the “meaning” of the results. But whatever meaning people derive from the results, we are about to witness one of the most miraculous aspects of American democracy: a peaceful transition […]

Stand with Maine’s next governor and vote “no” on Question 1

What if I told you I got Terry Hayes, Janet Mills, and Paul LePage to all agree on something? It would have to be pretty non-controversial, right? Something like “Maine should have good roads.” Let’s say we got Shawn Moody, John Baldacci, former Maine Supreme Court Chief Justice Dan Wathen, Alan Caron, and former Secretary […]

Will the Legislature be consistent in January?

Wednesday evening saw the Maine Legislature adjourn “sine die,” Latin for “without day.” In more practical terms, it means they are done. Until January. Thank goodness. As is tradition, the final day of the session was “veto day.” Legislators returned to the House and Senate to consider vetoes by the governor, as well as minor […]